Wednesday Writing Hook
Sure Hump-Day can suck, but we’ve decided to turn it into a *Hooray-Day* by releasing a new writing hook every week! Each edition will feature an image of an artefact, a complementary writing hook, and a little about its historical provenance, with a further reading option. We’d love to hear about the stories and adventures you wrote with them – be sure to detail them in the comments below! You can subscribe for more writing hooks, or find them on Facebook or Twitter.

The Writing Hook

At the north side of the great hall the wall is covered by a large tapestry 60 feet long by 20 feet tall. The finely made tapestry displays last year’s summer feast with the lord of teh castle sitting prominently in the middle, adored by his subjects and several good looking young girls. Your attention is drawn to the obscure and out of place flying discs on the top left of the tapestry. Asking around reveals a story about the appearance of these metallic discs that flew continuesly last year over the valley and stories of mutilated livestock and crazy runes on the wheat and barley fields north of here.

The Historical Facts of the Summer’s Triumph Tapestry

In 1538 AD a tapestry was created in the city of Bruges in Belgium, known as the Summer’s Triumph. It depicts the victorious ascension of a ruler to power. However, there is something far more interesting depicted in the tapestry, which would be easy to miss unless you were looking closely – multiple objects in the sky, which have the classical UFO shape that is popularised in the media.

The city of Bruges is the capital and the largest city of the province of West Flanders in the Flemish Region of Belgium in the northwest of the country. The origins of the city go back to the pre-roman Era and it has been the target of many invasions because of its strategic location.

If you look at the top of the tapestry, especially towards the left-hand side, it is possible to see a number of ‘hat shaped’ flying objects in black – that are not related to any religious depictions that are frequently seen in the sky in other medieval artworks.

Some historians have suggested that these objects represent the significance of this ruler coming to power and that he had the support of the ‘divine’.  But since when are flying disc shaped objects considered as a symbol of divine intervention? And if they are, why?  If the people in that era associated flying saucers with divinity, it means they were seeing such objects in the sky and linking them to a ‘godly’ phenomena. Of course on the other hand there are those who have claimed that these unusual hat-shaped objects are simple strangely-shaped dark clouds…

Looking for some more cool fact and hooks? Check the whole Wednesday Writing Hooks series

About Dimitris Romeo Havlidis

My name is Dimitris Romeo. I am a dyslexic one-eyed, web architect, developer and designer with a passion for photography, User Experience and telling stories.I spend my free time taking photos, watching tv series, cooking and watering my plants.I love lemon tarts, audiobooks, top hats, fantasy and science fiction in all its forms.

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